Posterior Solutions

The posterior region has a demanding set of requirements and challenges for the placement and restoration of implants.

Expert insights

9:22 - end. Dr. Russ Baer takes a detailed look at challenges and solutions for treating with implants in the posterior.
Dr. Peter Wöhrle explains his approach to posterior implant planning, placement and restoration.
Posterior implant placement is a common treatment modality in our practices. Dr. Salvesen discusses the need for simple, predictable, and reliable options. Often, when restoring a single missing posterior tooth the clinician will face multiple challenges including access, soft tissue closure, emergence profile, and retrievability. Currently available wide diameter implants, anatomical PEEK healing abutments and the angulated screw channel (ASC) abutment allow resolution of these issues with posterior implant rehabilitation.

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In the posterior jaw areas, tooth loss is usually associated with alveolar bone resorption and sinus pneumatization or alveolar nerve superficialization.
Prior to implant placement in the posterior site, a thorough radiographic examination by means of panoramic x-ray and/or dental CT or CBCT scan is recommended. This allows visualization of possible anatomic pitfalls, bone quantity and neuro-vascular structures.

Digital Textbooks

Single Implants and their Restoration
Single implants and their restoration
Because mandibular molars have mesiodistal dimensions and maxillary molars have faciolingual dimensions that average between 10.0 and 11.0 mm, the potential for overloading an implant-supported restoration is greater with molars than it is with premolars as mentioned previously.
Single Implants and their Restoration
Single implants and their restoration
Because the average mesiodistal dimension of maxillary and mandibular premolars is 7.0 to 7.5 mm, it is unlikely that occlusal overload will occur even when a 4.0 mm implant is not precisely centered beneath the crown. However, because mandibular molars have mesiodistal dimensions and maxillary molars have faciolingual dimensions that average between 10.0 and 11.0 mm, the potential for overload is much greater than with premolars.